Q&A

Meet the judges: 360i social marketing manager Masha Murakhovsky

We picked the brightest minds to judge the . Meet 360i’s Masha Murakhovsky.

Recognizing the most innovative marketers on the planet, the showcase the most original and creative advertising work being done today. And who best to determine the campaigns that earn Gold, Silver, and Bronze awards? Why our panel of esteemed judges representing the brightest minds from top brands and agencies, that’s who.

Let’s get to know one of the Twitter Awards judges: Masha Murakhovsky, a senior social marketing manager for 360i in New York. Masha currently leads social marketing and strategy for several Nestle brands and Subway and works closely with Twitter for agency development.

How does your agency use Twitter?

: A better question is, how do we not use Twitter?

Twitter is unique because it provides information and engagement opportunities faster than any other channel. They've done such a good job integrating the live experience that it opens up many doors for the brands we work with. Twitter really pushes us to think how we can speak the language users are already speaking on the platform.

Twitter is unique because it provides information and engagement opportunities faster than any other channel."

What is the key to a successful digital campaign?

: It's really a marriage of insights and cultural behavior. If you don't know your target audience and you're just pushing out a message—promoting promoting promoting, you end up speaking to no one and everyone. So you really need to understand who you're going after. What makes them tick? What is the emotional connection? You need to decide that first before you write content, produce video, or post pictures on any platform.

What was your favorite Twitter campaign?

: My favorite had to be that campaign from Australia []. It was really interesting to see how they were able to integrate insights into people's tweets, watch them talking about how “hangry” they were, and then drop the price of the candy at . It really resonated with me how they were able to take something so simple and execute it.

After I finished judging it I went over to my team members and said, "How we can do something like this?" And then I found a vending machine and got myself a Snickers.

What did you want to be when you grew up?

: I'm pretty sure I changed my mind about that every month between the ages of seven and 12. But the career path I thought about longest was fashion designer. My mom used to go to designer warehouse sales and find fun cool outfits for me in funky patterns and colors -- loud purples and pinks. So my favorite designer in those days was Betsy Johnson.

I still have those sketches somewhere in a shoe box.