Insights

Award shows still win big on Twitter

When awards season starts, the world turns its eyes to the red carpet and fans turn to Twitter as their front-row seat. 

The way people watch TV is changing, and that's especially true when it comes to award shows. On Twitter, award shows are increasingly relevant and are still capturing the full attention of the timeline.

Twitter is a go-to platform for award show stans 

From high fashion on the red carpet to emotional speeches made from the podium, award shows give us can’t-miss moments. And when those moments happen, fans of the movies, the TV shows, the music, and the stars turn to Twitter to watch the highlights and share their reactions. 

We find that fans are catching these moments first on Twitter as the conversations gain momentum on their timelines. According to a recent Twitter-commissioned survey, 84% of Twitter users surveyed agree that Twitter is their first stop for awards show news and updates, compared to a response of 52% and 45% for users of other major social media platforms.1 It’s this combination of real-time conversations, all-caps reactions, and real time live content that makes Twitter a go-to destination for award show night. 

Twitter draws lots of conversation on award show night, as audiences pair the timeline with their traditional, linear TV-viewing experience. Across three major 2021 award show events, for example, we saw a 21% increase in unique visitors during the Grammys.2 When it comes to sharing whatever’s on your mind following “and the winner is … ,” Twitter is a great place to connect with award show fans.

Fans turn to Twitter for the best overall award show experience

Even though they may be on the couch wearing sweatpants, Twitter lets people feel like they’re a part of the moment, almost as if they’re dressed up in the live audience. 

During three major award shows in 2021, fans spent a significant amount of time on Twitter to follow along in real time with live event updates and engaged in award show conversations as they developed. According to our research, more than 54% of those surveyed feel like they’re at the award show in person when viewing on Twitter, and 58% say that Twitter makes the viewing experience more interactive. 3

For fans, real-time conversations, access to exclusive premium video, and live-streaming experiences all offer behind-the-scenes looks and make for memorable moments. Twitter provides a content experience that allows for people to connect over red carpet looks, victories and upsets, and the hilarious and emotional acceptance speeches. Any more comprehensive and an usher would be showing you to your seat! 

Fans and brands, united

When fans come together and create community through conversation and co-viewing, it’s a great opportunity for brands to join in. In fact, 56% of those surveyed indicated that they enjoy seeing brands get involved when it comes to award show conversation,4 especially if the brand is aligned with the content. 

The good news is that brands are not only welcome to the conversation, but when they do take part, people notice their involvement. 55% of people on Twitter surveyed said that when a brand sponsors or comments on award show moments, it makes them seem more relevant.5 It’s this direct connection with audiences around moments they care about that can take marketing campaigns from good to great and makes award shows truly valuable to brands.

Real time is the right time for brands

Memorable moments that occur during award shows are still very much relevant on Twitter, with people watching the night unfold in real time. That’s why brands looking to connect with a receptive and passionate audience should first explore where the conversation buzzes on the timeline; it’s through these major tentpoles and cultural moments that marketers can lead the conversation and develop brand affinity. But more importantly, aligning with award shows on Twitter can help drive attention and recognition for brands. And that’s just as valuable as taking home an honorary statue. 

Sarah Rosen (@sarahrosen) is the Head of U.S. Content Partnerships at Twitter. She previously served as the Head of U.S. entertainment and news partnerships. Prior to joining Twitter in 2014, she worked at Viacom as senior director of partner management and program development and as director of consumer marketing for MTV Games.

Sources

1  Twitter Insiders, Award Show Study. N=1,154, all of whom have watched award shows in the last 12 months. N=577 monthly Twitter users / N=577 monthly users of other social media platforms. US. July 20 -26, 2021 
2 Custom Daypart Analysis, Comscore Media Metrix & Mobile Metrix, 
Shift in unique visitors on Twitter vs. other social platforms (Event vs. average of 3 weeks prior during same day of week & airing time), (Grammys 3/14/21, Golden Globes 2/28/21, Oscars 4/25/21, US)
3 Twitter Insiders, Award Show Study. N=1,154, all of whom have watched award shows in the last 12 months. N=577 monthly Twitter users / N=577 monthly users of other social media platforms. US. July 20 -26, 2021)
4 Twitter Insiders, Award Show Study. N=1,154, all of whom have watched award shows in the last 12 months. N=577 monthly Twitter users / N=577 monthly users of other social media platforms. US. July 20 -26, 2021)
5 Source: Twitter Insiders Study, Award Shows and Entertainment, n=1,154, all of whom have watched award shows in the last 12 months, US Only, July 20 - 26, 2021. 

March 15, 2022
Tags
  • TV
  • Media & Entertainment
  • Research
  • Media & Entertainment
  • Music
  • Movies
  • North America

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